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Pubs, Palaces and Promises

What the tourism industry can teach us about marketing.

I suggested to Mrs H we could do with a few days away. A break from the routine given what has been going on for us all just lately.  We ummmed and arrred about it and decided it would be a good idea.  So, I guess we were a bit unsure as to what everything would be like in what’s now classed as ‘the new normal’ – but you have to move on.

Research completed, we decided on The Cotswolds.  We’ve not done the area before but heard lots of good reports about it. Plus, there are plenty of country roads to stretch the legs of our MX5.

The pub we’d booked was in the middle of nowhere and had just re-opened. When we checked in it was almost like the owners were apologetic for the hassle COVID-19 had caused them. They almost felt it was there fault. 

To us it didn’t matter that the menu was reduced, or that they couldn’t offer a full cooked breakfast. Whilst a full English would have been nice, my  waistline gave a sigh of relief.

Here’s the thing though, what they did do really well was to set our expectations. From the moment we arrived, everything was explained to us. There were no surprises.  There was even a letter in our room apologising for any inconvenience caused. Plus on top of that there was a discount code for us to use until the end of the year.

And the pub wasn’t the only place this happened. We visited Blenheim Palace too and experienced similar.  Apologies for the inconvenience, here’s how to make the best of the day, plus have a free year pass to come and visit us again.

One thing is for sure,  each of these customer touchpoints hadn’t just been thrown together. They had been thought about and put into a plan.

For me this trip highlighted a few things they were doing right:

  • Set the expectations for your customer
  • Give them something to make them come back again for more
  • Have a plan

Set the expectations

If you don’t set expectations then you’re not doing yourself any favours let alone your clients. It’s not rocket science, just put yourself in your clients’ shoes. What would you want to know at the start of a project?

  • What’s the process going to be?
  • When are you going to be in touch?
  • What are the next steps?
  • Here’s what we’ll do
  • Here’s what we need from you

More, more, more

The excitement of landing a new client and getting that first job done is always a buzz. Sometimes though, the follow-up and keeping in touch is often forgotten. It’s not intentional, but we’re focussed on that next shiny new customer.  But, shouldn’t we be encouraging our customers to come back for more?

  • Regular strategic reviews
  • How else can we help you?
  • Here’s something we thought you’d benefit from
  • Here’s an introduction for you

Have a plan

We know the old adage, ‘Failing to plan is planning to fail’, so it makes sense that having a plan is a good idea. Plus if you spend some time to identify and review all of your customer touchpoints and map them out, you’ll create an amazing and consistent customer experience.

Unfortunately, sometimes we get too busy or are too focussed on chasing the dollar, that we don’t put the time aside to plan and/ or review our own customer touchpoints.

And do we consider the impact that this has on our own brand and the values we set out when we started our own business?

Help is at hand

If you are struggling to get your touchpoints in place or you need help with your marketing plan, let’s have a chat.

You can book a call with us here.

We’ve worked with

HITACHI
Heating Style
Thrive Law
Dataiku
Robinson Ralph